Welcome to BASH! - Basic Action Superheroes
Honor + Intrigue!!  Cinematic Swashbuckling Rolepaying Game
  Login or Register
::  Home  ::  Your Account  ::  Forums  ::
   
Menu
 
Site Information
Last SeenLast Seen
Server TrafficServer Traffic
  • Total: 25,548,212
  • Today: 3,539
Server InfoServer Info
  • Nov 15, 2019
  • 09:43 pm EST
 
 
BASH! - Basic Action Superheroes: Forums

BASH - Basic Action Super Heroes :: View topic - The Zenith Comics Universe

 
 Forum FAQForum FAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups      RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

The Zenith Comics Universe
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    BASH - Basic Action Super Heroes Forum Index -> Your Campaign Settings
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
AslanC
Zenith Comics
Zenith Comics


Joined: Apr 04, 2010
Posts: 1130
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 7:25 am    Post subject: The Zenith Comics Universe Reply with quote

This thread will be about various parts of my Zenith Comics Universe. Much of this material will see eventual print as source book material, but for now I want to share it all with you in its raw form, so you can see how it develops, with feedback and commentary welcome of course.

Please note that a lot of this material is deconstructionist in nature, though not cynical or trying to mock the super-hero conventions/tropes that I love so much.

Also note that this is a Bronze Age universe, set in 1984. This is my favorite era of comics and as such where my interest in creating/writing lies.

When dealing with the Golden and Silver Ages, they will be seen through a Bronze Age lens. For example, the real world Golden Age of comics is very different than the one presented in the pages of the All-Star Squadron or the Invaders comics. Those two are more in line with how I see those ages rather than the actual printed comics of those times.

Without further ado;

The Ages

Introduction

The purpose of this document is to provide a very quick overview of the period of super-humanity in the 20th century. This time is divided into 3 “ages” based on the classical Greek Ages of mythology. While those ages in legend refer to better times, we make no claims that the previous ages of heroes were better or worse than the next, it is used simply as a handy way of measuring the distinct times.

The Golden Age

The Golden Age started in 1928 when the Masked Avenger first made headlines in his one man war on organized crime. He may have been the first, but he was far from the last. His actions seemed to herald a tide of mystery-men and women who would first spread across America and then the world.

Colorful circus strongman and wrestler costumes were the order of the day and most wore masks to hide their identities and to avoid prosecution by some over zealous District Attorneys on charges of vigilantism. In time though the Police and most cities came to accept the costumed crusaders in their midst and even work with them.

The first costumed criminal was also the first super-powered being of the Golden Age and also the leader of the first super-team, though it was a villain group called the Super Gang. The Black Eagle had tremendous large black wings and carried a raygun that could melt steel. He would clash with almost every hero of the time, but his primary enemy was Golden Gloves, a non-powered mystery man who used boxing to thwart crime.

When Hitler unveiled the first Nazi super in 1938 the world held its collective breath. Der Übermann changed the face of international politics and as he would prove in North Africa, modern warfare. The mad dash to match the super human arms race started by the Germans would lead to many a great hero and some truly tragic accidents.

By the time America joined the war in 1941, there were dozens of heroes on all sides, villains to match and the catch term for the day went from “Mystery Man” to “Super Hero”. For reasons never revealed, after one brief excursion into German controlled territory, the most powerful super heroes were sent to protect their home lands, leaving essentially the Allied strike force, the Victory Squad alone in the European Theater. At home the remaining heroes were unified under the flag of the United Sentinels of America by order of President Roosevelt.

By the end of the war, though many supers had died on all sides, a significantly large number survived and returned to their prewar crime-fighting activities. While some were able to make the transition to civilian crime-fighting again and some were not, the American government wasn't either. When the United Sentinels of America refused to deploy to the Korean theatre, some within the government soon where asking “Why masks?” and “Could the Scarlet Streak really be a Red?” When the orders came down they were direct and simple, unmask and sign loyalty statements or be considered vigilantes and be hunted. Scores of super heroes vanished over night, refusing to unmask for the safety of their loved ones. Some fought on, but when Dr. Dynamite was shot to death by Police in a botched arrest attempt in 1952, the Golden Age came to an end.

The Silver Age

There is some debate as to when exactly the Silver Age began, but for most the starting point is 1958 when the flying luxury liner SS Titan was saved from crashing by Captain Comet and his Rocket Rangers. Their daring rescue of the first and only flying liner got world wide coverage and rekindled the heroic ideals of Americans.

The Silver Age was also about something else that may have always been present, but really came into its own, the notion of space. Science and space played such a large part of this time that some think it should be renamed the Space Age. Certainly the Golden Age saw plenty of space and science related heroes and villains, but this age was swamped with them.

Not long after Captain Comet's appearance, like the Masked Avenger before him, a new wave of heroes and villains began. Space men, super spies and the ever present mystics, made up the lion's share of these men and women. Hope for tomorrow and a brighter future drove these colorful costumed folk on and the public was happy to have them, but then the 60's came and the world began to change again.

When JFK was killed, Lady America was reported as having been assigned to guard the Vice-President that day. When she later questioned why she had those orders, stories say LBJ gave her a dressing down in the Oval Office. She was later deployed to Vietnam, seemingly as a punishment.

The Vietnam war and the Civil Rights movement were not to be spared the touch of the super hero or even the super villain, but in the end these events were their own and certainly not overly affected by the actions of the costumed set.

As the 70s came in things began to change, the heroes were growing darker and more ruthless. Soon many were openly carrying guns and other lethal weapons. There was a shift coming but first a shorter age would have to be passed through. The Silver Age slid into the Bronze Age in 1975 with the arrest of Captain Thunderbird for the murder of two Chicago mobsters.

The Bronze Age

The world had changed, the OPEC Crisis, the Watergate Scandal and rampant inflation was changing America and slowly it was changing her heroes as well. More and more stories were surfacing about heroes being more aggressive, not accepting surrender of criminals without a “finishing blow” and even killing their enemies.

For 10 years the media ignored this and slowly the public began to become suspicious of the heroes and their behaviors. The premiere hero group of the day, the Guardians did their best to uphold more noble ideals, but theirs was a battle to be lost. The self indulgence of the 70s and the greed of the 80s were just not instep with upright, moralistic, old school thinking.

The Bronze Age can therefore been seen as one last gasp of a previous generation to hold onto something that was a bit nobler than their times, but the times were calling for a new type of hero.

In 1979 Dr. Walter Van Jove, the foremost expert on superhumans in the world wrote a book entitled “The Shape of Things to Come: The Super Future”. In it he predicted an explosion in the population of superhumans globally within the coming decade as well as major leaps forward in technology, pioneered by what he termed “Super Geniuses” whose only powers would be to invent, improve or develop new technologies.

In late 1983 something happened that shook the world. The Guardians were attacked in their base by a team of anti-democratic and despotic themed villains called the Axis of Evil, lead by none other than Der Übermann. They destroyed the satellite base of the heroes and when all was said and done the leader of the Guardians, considered to be the World’s greatest hero, the Guardsman was dead.

On a cold January 3rd 1984, the Guardsman was put to rest at the Heroes Hill cemetery in Capitol City. The crowds lined the streets as his funeral procession went by, thousands deep. The funeral itself attended by heroes from all corners of the world, 3 former Presidents and the current one as well. It was televised globally to millions of viewers and it sent a powerfully dark message to all. The world they had known was forever changed.

Afterword

Some say that the death of the Guardsman marks the end of the Bronze Age and the beginning of an inevitable Iron Age. Still others say that it is just the midway point and the Bronze Age may yet not be over. Whether or not this is the case, many wonder if Dr. Van Jove’s promised wave of supers and technological advances will come to be or is simply a pipe dream.

According to EAGLE files there are over 500 known superheroes and villains globally and an estimated 200 more who have powers but do not “suit up” to coin a phrase. There has also been an increase in the number of governments that are employing superhumans in their militaries and other agencies. Some have speculated that this many superhumans will either lead to a new dominant form of humanity or a culling of the herd in some sort of crisis.

While the future remains unclear, for now superhumans are here to stay, for good or bad.

*All characters and concepts presented in this thread are the intellectual property of Earth Alpha/Zenith Comics. All rights reserved.
_________________


Last edited by AslanC on Thu Apr 15, 2010 10:43 am; edited 4 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
AslanC
Zenith Comics
Zenith Comics


Joined: Apr 04, 2010
Posts: 1130
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Victory Squad

The Victory Squad is most famous for being the American team of Major Victory, Lady America and their respective sidekicks Kid Victory and Spangle. While it is true that the focus of this team was these costumed super-patriots, many people do not realize that there was also a team of highly trained soldiers from almost every branch of the US Army that were also part of the Victory Squad.

To understand the Victory Squad we must look at their origins, then their run as the most effective Allied unit and their eventual demise at the raid on Castle Fear.

When the Victory Program was first launched, most in the military saw it as a waste of resources. While they saw the potential devastation of Germany's super man, Der Übermann, many didn't believe he was as powerful as the news reels had made him out to be.

The idea of American super soldiers at a cost of millions of dollars to develop to them was a waste of millions that could be spent on gear and training infantry men to do the same job.

When Doctor Phineas Titansky (come Doc Titan) was able to not only produce results by testing his super power granting Infinity Serum on himself but also producing four other super soldiers, a lot of opinions changed.

When the four were deployed to the European theatre in 1942 they fell under the command of Allied Commander, Major General James E. Chaney. It was no secret that Chaney was not at all interested in having them in the theatre and equally felt the costumed soldiers were nothing more than a morale booster. As such he confined them to USO Camp Shows and only in England, far from the front.

The shows they appeared at were a great success and their displays of physical ability thrilled the soldiers, but they had been reduced to little more than show ponies. It is even reported that Lady America and Spangle would do song & dance routines to the cat calls of the soldiers in attendance. This use of the super soldiers infuriated Doctor Titansky, who beseeched President Roosevelt to force General Chaney to use the super soldiers as actual soldiers, but the President refused, citing his absolute trust in the General’s decisions. All that changed on December 24th, 1942.

At a Christmas Eve USO show at the ETOUSA HQ in London, with the new Commanding General, European Theater of Operations, General Eisenhower in attendance, Der Übermann and a whole team of Axis supers called the Super Axis (Actually they were known to the Nazis as Die Blitzkrieger or the Lightning Warriors, but it was translated into English by the Allies as the Super Axis, which is also how it appeared in the comic exploits being published about the Victory Squad back home). The Nazis attacked in force, along with a full squad of reanimated undead Nazi paratroopers. Their mission was to kill the all the Allied commanders in one fell swoop. Unfortunately for them the Victory Squad was performing at that show.

What resulted was an epic battle where the four American supers soldiers were not only able to save the Allied Commanders, but also drive off the Nazi villains. History tells us that General Eisenhower was so impressed by what he saw that he changed his mind on the Victory Squad that very night and they would go on to legend.

What most don’t know is that there were a dozen American soldiers involved managed to secure weapons from undead paratroopers and use them to harass the Nazi villains as well. Of the twelve quick thinking soldiers, only two survived; Corporal Jack Jenkins and Sergeant Hank “Hurricane” McShane (A baseball legend who played for the Capitol City Blue Sox). No fool, and perhaps seeing the need for a support team backing the costume soldiers, General Eisenhower assigned these two men to the Victory Squad and ordered that ten more volunteers be found to join them to bring their numbers back to twelve, in honour of the ten men who had died at the USO show fighting back.

At first many of these men felt they were being asked to “volunteer” for either a soft detail or babysitting. Many jokes were made at their expense by other soldiers, but after their first foray into occupied France left half of them dead, they started to see it as an elite unit. It should be pointed out that the “volunteer” part was no more voluntary than the draft was. Many found themselves “volunteering” for the duty. For many new volunteers the idea of working with Lady America and Spangle was an insult. The vets of the team knew differently as they had witnessed first hand Lady A’s ferocity and her dedication to Victory Squad. It was not unheard of for a new squad volunteers’ gripes about “working with a dame” to be met by veteran members of the squad standing up for her and telling the tales of how she had saved their lives on more than one occasion.

A sidenote about Lady America showed her tenacity and drive to be taken seriously as a soldier. In May 1942, Lady America requested better uniforms for her and Spangle, as it seemed too many soldiers were looking up her skirt during battles. She also asked that the four costumed soldiers be given sidearms as well. The request was refused by Eisenhower’s office, so Lady America and Spangle marched into his office, whipped off their skirts, threw them on his desk and announced that they would battle Hitler with their with undergarments visible from that day forward. Her request was reconsidered and approved the next day.

For the duration of the war Sergeant McShane and Corporal Jenkins managed to survive the longest, being the only members of the original Victory Squad, other than the costumed heroes, to be part of the last battle. It is rumoured, though never proven, that there was an attempt to make a recruitment news reel featuring the two that was scrapped due to Jenkins inability to not swear ever other word and McShane’s lack of acting ability making him seem wooden and unappealing.

The ultimate fate of the Victory Squad would be a tragic, yet heroic one. Volunteering to lead a raid on Castle Fear, the base of operations for the Super Axis, then entire team would be wiped out in the resulting battle (except for Lady America) that achieved its mission of removing the Nazi supers as a battle force. This act assured that the Allied troops descending on Berlin in 1945 were not impeded by the Super Axis.

In 1979 Lady America petitioned to have a monument raised in honor of the Victory Squad, though the petition was defeated in Congress due to costs, a sad end to a story of the incredible heroism of normal soldiers alongside the greatest super soldiers in American history.
_________________


Last edited by AslanC on Thu Apr 15, 2010 10:12 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
AslanC
Zenith Comics
Zenith Comics


Joined: Apr 04, 2010
Posts: 1130
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This essay is taken from the book "The Golden Age; A Collection of Essays on the Heroes of Yesterday" by Tribune Press, from 1981. These are the thoughts of Air Force Major Elizabeth Burton, the first female pilot to engage in a dogfight with enemy fighters. Her call sign is "Lady A" after her favorite superhero and role model Lady America.

1. Before The War

The Golden Age, as it has been called by historians, is the age wherein the "Super-Hero" or "Mystery-Men" first appeared. It's official staring date would be 1935, when the Masked Avenger broke up a Chicago gangland gambling den and killed Mob Boss Victor Sciscenti in retaliation for the deaths of nine Chicago police officers. He never took a name, and in fact was given the moniker the Masked Avenger by the papers, based on eye-witness accounts. Although the Masked Avenger was enigmatic, he did from time-to-time come into contact with other members of the Golden Age elite, but her never joined a team, and no one ever found out who he was under the mask.

Within one year of the Masked Avenger's beginning exploits, there occurred an explosion of super-heroes and mystery-men across North America, and in a limited sense overseas. Perhaps some of the most notable of the time were Golden Gloves and Sunboy, who would go on to become Sunman later in the early 40’s. Golden Gloves was nothing more than a boxer turned crime-fighter when the Irish mob began terrorizing non-Irish immigrants in Hell's Kitchen, New York city. Sunboy was the promise of what tomorrow would bring, he was just a teenager from the Mid-West who was imbued with the powers of the Sun, of course he could operate at night, but then only at half power due to the reflected sunlight of the moon. These two set the stage for the rest to come. They were in fact the models that all others would be based for awhile.

The first collection of supers as a team was not heroes, but in fact a group of villains calling themselves the Supergang. Lead by a man named Black Eagle, these villains perpetrated scores of crimes, only ever being stopped, and never captured by super-heroes of the time.

The response to their teaming was the formation of a team of mystery men called appropriately enough, the Gangbusters. Made up of a half dozen of the union suit vigilantes of the day, they would stick together until the war and keep the streets of New York City as safe as could be.

The is also a story that suggests that during the war, Supergang and members of the United Sentinels of America (hereafter: USofA) teamed up to stop a team of 5th columnists called the Swastika Seven from destroying the then Boulder Dam. While there is no proof to back this story, those surviving members of the USofA have never denied it.

One other person of note would be the first woman to don a costume and take up crime fighting. Although she would be the first to retire, in 1942 with a spinal injury causing her to lose the use of her legs, Night Woman was a figure-head for the other women heroes to come. She was in fact the widow of a man who had decided to try and fight crime as Night Man. After about 2 months of action, he was shot by the mob and barely managed to get home, where he died in his wife's arms. Enraged, she chose to extract a measure of revenge on the mob for the murder, and copied her husbands plans and desires. On January 10th, 1940, she made her first move, smashing up the book-making offices of the mobsters who killed her husband. This brought her to the attention of the Masked Avenger, with whom she teamed for almost the rest of her career. Night Woman suffered her injury at the hands of the Mafia connected hitman Hammer Hurricane (who would later gain powers under less than noble circumstance) during a battle in the Bowery section of New York City. Lucky to be alive, she retired and faded from the stage, and was never heard from again. Still she had broken ground and paved the way for other such notable heroines as Silver Sparrow, Grass Hopper, Lady Luck and Miss Liberty, all of whom would have a major impact on the Golden Age, each in her own way.

Silver Sparrow and Grasshopper were the first America supers to battle Nazi saboteurs, In New York on December 21st 1941. This action caught the attention of local newspapers and soon their names were well known to Americans. It is sad how many texts on the time still credit these two as being the first super-heroines, as Night Woman had a very quiet career and disappeared relatively quickly. It is equally sad how Grasshopper, a Japanese-American, was interred during the war, a black spot on our nation’s history to be sure.

The concept of Lady Luck and Miss Liberty was cooked up by the War Department as a way to sponsor war bonds. A talent search was held, and the two ladies who won had their visages plastered all over America. They became an overnight sensation, and did more touring than crime-fighting, but still they managed to make a huge impression and develop a following. An interesting side-note is that neither woman was super-powered in any way, and aside from gymnastics training, neither had any combat related skills to speak of. Still they were invited to join the USofA after the war. In light now of how their lives ended, they may have been on the greatest losses of the aftermath of the Golden Age.

2. Heroes At War

The war was the next major event for the heroes, and it produced the newest form of super-hero, the patriot. Contrary to popular opinion the first flag-wrapped hero did not come from America, but in fact from it's northern neighbor Canada. Already involved in the war, before the Americans, the Canadian Government, along with British support, began a project to create a super-hero under controlled conditions. They labored for a year, and on January 21st, 1940 they struck success by bonding a strange energy to a man who would become the Red Ensign, the carrier of the flag, and the first official super-hero to do battle with the Nazis. The Red Ensign was also without a doubt the most powerful hero of his day, he could lift in excess of 20 tons, rifle rounds bounced off of him and tank shells only knocked him to the ground. He could fly by controlling the winds around him and seemed immune to aging and disease. Only later would it be discovered that the energy that had been fused to him was in fact an air-elemental, and that it was slowly taking over his body.

Although this was the first allied hero, the Japanese, Italians and Germans already had super-powered soldiers in the field. Hengeyokai, Yokozuna and Tsunami lead the charge for the Japanese in 1931 against the Manchurians. Imperator crushed opposition for Italy during the invasion of Ethiopia in 1935 and Übermann, Überfrau, Herr Vulture, Wotan and Stuka were unveiled by Hitler in 1938. While these were to be the first Axis supers, they would not be the last, and even benefited from a Soviet super by the name of Vikuz, although she left and joined up with allied supers after Hitler's betrayal of Russia in 1941.

America was not to be left behind in the super-hero race, and astounded Commonwealth scientists by producing not one, but three super-powered soldiers only one year after their success with the Red Ensign. Using a technique that is perhaps still one of the closest guarded secrets in the world, the War Department was able to take four normal people, one man, one woman, a young boy and a teenage girl, and enhance their physical attributes to the peak of human conditioning. The four were rushed into intensive training, and emerged as Major Victory, Lady America, Kid Victory and Spangle.

Once the war was under way, many felt it was important for the heroes to come to the aid of their government and fight in the war, but that would not be. Excluding an elite group of heroes and mystery men, code-named the Victory Squad, put together by the Allies for that purpose, the majority of heroes and mystery-men would never leave North American shores during the war. The reason for this was the belief that the Axis Supers would be drawn into the fray and many lives would be lost. The Victory Squad’s purpose was simple, neutralize the Axis supers. To this end they were joined by a number of European supers, and even a supposed Atlantean called Mermaid. There would be two more mystically inclined supers to join up; from England, the English Knight, a man who claimed to wield the magical sword of King Arthur, Excalibur, and from Greece, Aegis, whose sword, helmet, shield, armor, bow and sandals were supposedly gifts from the Olympian gods of old. Whether that fact was true of not is irrelevant to this text, both men would face foes who claimed to be their mystical antithesis. For the English Knight there was Sir Blood, who claimed to be a vampiric knight empowered by Morgan LeFey. While it was never proven, Sir Blood did posses abilities classically attributed to such undead creatures. Aegis though faced an even older threat; according to his own testimony, Imperator was granted magical artifacts of war by Ares, the Olympian god of war, who wished to see the struggle in Europe continue. While there is much debate as to whether or not these claims were true, most who witnessed the clashing of these titans agree that they did in fact wield powerful artifacts.

Certain heroes even hung up their cowls and joined the armed forces, wanting to fight for their country. Some even ignored the decision from the War Department for them not to engage the enemy and headed overseas anyways. The war certainly was a test of fire for the heroes, as they spent the majority of it protecting the home-front against subterfuge and terrorism perpetrated by the enemy. The largest collection of these heroes and heroines would be the USofA. Formed by Golden Gloves and Sunman, by the war's end almost every home-front hero would be a member. Still, the names of the originals are perhaps the most important of the day, they were Golden Gloves, Sunman, Dr. Dynamite, Grasshopper, Silver Sparrow, Thunder-Man and Doc Titan. These seven would form the backbone of the team and remain loyal to it's ranks until the very end.

Another home-front team that did not fair as well were the Mysterymen. Only three strong, The Mysterymen fought against saboteurs and fifth columnists on the west coast. Comprised of the enigmatic Silver Squid, the hulking Stone and the quantum powered Schrodinger Kid, the team met its end when they were forced off a sea-side road during a high speed chase with Nazi agents, crashing more than two-hundred feet to their deaths. Never incurring much press or media, they still managed to provide an example of all American's desire to what they could during the war.

Perhaps the greatest tragedy of the war was the loss of a number of heroes in battle at Castle Fear, near the war's end. Lead by the Victory Squad, every Allied hero and Axis super in the European Theatre were there. While the details remain sketchy and classified, it is known that the British super Hawker was killed by Stuka, Canadian hero Grizzly by Wotan and Spangle was killed at the hands of Überfrau. The falling of these heroes seemed to unleash the fury of the Allied supers against their enemies and more than eight fell on either side, including Major Victory and Kid Victory. Oddly enough, there are reports that some sort of advanced robot, housing the brain of Hitler emerged from a spatial vortex and aided many of the Axis supers in fleeing. While the American military nicknamed this robot the Iron Fuhrer, they did not honestly accept its existence as a reality. Other than the heroes and villains who witnessed the event there is no proof to collaborate their testimony. Regardless of these rumors, the battle broke the will of the Axis supers who were routed, many escaping into the Alps. Those that were captured would go on to stand trial at Nuremberg.

All-in-all the war time took it toll of the population of heroes with some deaths, some disappearances and some retirements, but for the most part they went on strong. In 1949 the USofA held it's last meeting, and official disbanded. Many recall it as a tearful day, and the press covered it almost as much as the day the war ended. For many an era had come to an end, but it was not so, as soon enough many villains, including the Supergang returned to threaten the world. The American people called for their heroes again, and they returned. On a cold October night in 1950 the USofA returned to battle Supergang one last time. Lead by Sunman and Golden Gloves, they were heroes to millions and seen as the only heroes who could stand for all that was good about America. It was not to last.

3. The End Of The Golden Age

The end of America's Golden Age heroes was not one that befit all that they had accomplished. Mired down by paranoid-anti-communist fears, they were soon turned on by those they had sworn to protect, and many voluntarily went into retirement to protect their families. In 1952 the Golden Age truly came to an end when Dr. Dynamite was shot and killed while fleeing police who were under orders to arrest him due to the Superhuman Loyalty Act.

4. Last Notes

I would go into details on the events that ended the Golden Age here, but it is really a tale more fitting the Silver Age. I say this because while it was the close of one age, it was instrumental in the formation of the next. Also, for very personal reasons, I find it hard to write objectively about what I and many others see, as the betrayal of America's greatest heroes, and I shall leave it at that.

I hope that this short treatise will serve to further this document on the history of super-heroes, as it culminates over 25 years of research. My prayer is that perhaps, in these darker times, people can take hope from the past and maybe understand why more than ever the world needs heroes. I hope you enjoyed it and more importantly share it, we must never forget.

Elizabeth Burton, April 4th, 1981.
_________________


Last edited by AslanC on Fri Apr 16, 2010 6:00 pm; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
AslanC
Zenith Comics
Zenith Comics


Joined: Apr 04, 2010
Posts: 1130
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The following is a transcript from a late November 1983 broadcast of “The Nightowl” radio talk show on WMSH 1460 AM in Capitol City. The interviewer is right-winged host , Jack Porter.

=-=-=-=-=

Porter: (Slightly monotone voice) Joining us in the studio this hour is Robert Hoyt, who has written a book entitled “Golden Lies: A True History of the Golden Age of Heroes”. A book that… well.. a book that takes everything you thought you knew about the Golden Age and turns it on its’ ear. That about sum it up right Bob?

Hoyt: (Nervous) Yes Jack, that’s about the long and the short of it.

Porter: (matter of factly) So Sun Man was a homosexual?

Hoyt: That’s correct.

Porter: Dr. Dynamite was assassinated on purpose?

Hoyt: Yes

Porter: Supergang and the Sentinels fought the Swastika Seven together… (nonchalantly) well we’ve all heard that one before…

Hoyt: (laughs a bit) Yes one of the worst kept secrets of the…

Porter: (Interrupting him) Ubermann was created by Doc Titan’s brother and was brought to America after the war?

Hoyt: Yes (swallows as if setting himself) Piter Titansky was trapped in Poland where he lived with their mother after the divorce in 1928, while Phineas…

Porter: (Cutting him off) But here’s the biggest bombshell of the book… There was no Castle Fear? Are you listening friends. The Victory Squad never fought at Castle Fear and … hang on to your seats on this one… They were killed in Berlin fighting Ubermann over Hitler’s bunker! Can you believe that!?

Hyot: (Hesitant sensing a trap) Yes… that’s true Jack…

Porter: (Not stopping) And they were all killed! Major Victory? Killed there. Kid Victory? Yup! Spangle? (speaks staccato) Torn in half by Uberfrau. (back to normal) That’s right!

Hoyt: This was all seen…

Porter: (still going) And Lady America! That’s right, our own beloved Lady A was killed as well. (goes deep serious voice) Think about this for a second. (pause) Lady America. Dead in 1945. So who has been running around as her since then?

Hoyt: Well they…

Porter: (Explosively interrupting) A succession of replacement women! Trained for the job and surgically altered to look just like the original! Can you believe it listeners?

Hoyt: (Emphatically) Yes Jack! And this is all true!

Porter: So why not have the other three, Major Victory and Kid Victory? And the girl, Spangle? Why not have them running around too? Why create this whole Castle Fear story?

Hoyt: (Sheepishly) That I don’t know Jack.

Porter: (Decidedly) You don’t know. (sighs) You just don’t know.

Hoyt: The rest of this information comes from a good source though! I…

Porter: (Interrupting aggressively) Your source was none other than Lady America herself!

Hoyt: (Triumphantly) That’s right!

Porter: (Condescendingly) In 1982! 1982! Everyone knows that was not really Lady America at all! That was an evil clone! Set loose by the Citadel no-less! And you expect us to believe anything this woman had to say?

Hoyt: (Fighting back but not strong) What… what about the Russian soldier who witnessed the fight in Berlin?

Porter: (Dismissive) A Commie soldier? What are you crazy? Those pinkos would say anything to discredit our great nation, especially in our greatest victory! Poppycock!

Hoyt: (almost a mewling sound) But you don’t… I need to…

::Microphone Feedback::

Porter: That’s it! I’ve cut off your microphone! Now I want security to get this lunatic out of the station right now! We gotta go to break! (Yelling away from mic) GET SECURITY IN HERE!

=-=-=-=-=-=

It should be noted that Robert Hoyt committed suicide three weeks later when the publisher of this book, Heritage Press, refused to pay him for the book, leaving him penniless.
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
AslanC
Zenith Comics
Zenith Comics


Joined: Apr 04, 2010
Posts: 1130
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Editor's Note

You may notice when reading this that there are contradictions in events, persons, places, etc that crop up from time to time.

This is done on purpose, as it pertains to an overall conspiracy.

The Zenith Comics Universe campaign is designed to be somewhat similar to the themes presented in the Watchmen comic book. The truth is not being told and what some accept as fact, others do not.

Eventually it will all come out.

Until then please feel free to comment/speculate on what you think is going on. Smile
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
AslanC
Zenith Comics
Zenith Comics


Joined: Apr 04, 2010
Posts: 1130
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Citadel

The origins of what has become the most powerful and dangerous paramilitary/secret society in American history, finds its origins alongside those of this great nation itself. I say this based on the fact that if there was no United States of America, there would be no Citadel. Allow me to explain.

After the conclusion of the War of Independence ushered in the birth of the United States of America, a group of rich and influential United Empire Loyalists went underground and began plotting the overthrow of the fledgling nation with the desire to return her to British rule.

Calling themselves “The Citadel”, named for their first secret meeting place Citadel Hill in Capitol City, there were thirteen members. Each represented one of the original colonies and they drew up their Declaration of Submission to counter the Declaration of Independence.

For a while they were nothing more than a group of malcontents, but slowly they began to build a secret army of mercenaries and an impressive cabal of assassins. It wasn’t long before they acted. Assassinating various important business men who supported the new government and even making attempts on the President and members of the Continental Congress.

In the end, while they proved to be dangerous, they seemed hopelessly incompetent and unable to achieve their goals.

After America came to the aid of England in two World Wars, it seemed the fire of the Citadel was lost. To them, no longer was England some greater ideal to be part of, but a failed empire to be ashamed of. Then came Lord Sovereign.

At the end of World War II a new leader of the Citadel emerged. He was a powerful armoured man calling himself Lord Sovereign and his ascension to leadership involved killing the current thirteen members who were the council of the Citadel.

Once his power was secure he changed the modus operandi of the Citadel to one of infiltration. Slowly the organization gather recruits at all levels of American society and from all walks of life. Only two things were required to become a member of this new Citadel. A believe in the God of Abraham and to be of white European descent.

Borrowing the lessons of the Nazis, the Citadel began using rank and regalia to convince its members that they were the masters of the world and that since the House of Windsor had failed to maintain the British Empire, they no longer were owed the fealty of the Citadel.

This subversive campaign continued from the mid-50’s right through to the modern day. For the first twenty years of their reorganizing, the Citadel vanished from the radar of the FBI and was considered to be a defunct group. They returned to prominence with the assassination of twelve congressmen, each representing what was once the Thirteen Colonies. Left on each body was the Declaration of Empire.

The Declaration of Empire simply states that the only true authority is that of Lord Sovereign, the first Empire of America. The document goes on to state that the United States of America, including Alaska and Hawaii were under his rule and that the current government should immediately recognize his absolute authority. If they did not they would be considered in a state of war with the American Empire.

Needless to say the government did not comply. A massive investigation was ordered, but thanks to the levels of infiltration into the FBI and the CIA by the Citadel, hampered and prevented any truly useful intelligence being gathered. Once it was realized that these agencies were infiltrated, then President Nixon ordered them all disbanded and their operations taken over by a new agency, the American Intelligence Agency (AIA) headed up by G. Gordon Liddy. It is firmly believed that this act lead to the Watergate scandal, as an act by agents of the Citadel.

In 1980 the Citadel was able to kidnap Lady America and replace her with a clone of their own creation. This clone was able to pass undetected for two years, despite having different powers and even after a medical inspection by Doc Titan. The clone Lady America served as a member of the Guardians and was even active as the bodyguard of President Regan. Then in 1982 she went on a rampage, attempting to fight her way into the Pentagon, defeating many heroes who came to stop her. Finally the real Lady America, who managed to escape from the Citadel’s clutches, arrived to defeat her doppelganger.

It is estimated by EAGLE (Extended American Government Law Enforcement) that the number of Citadel sleepers and infiltrators allows for 1 in 500 Americans to have unknowing contact with the Citadel every day. The AIA puts that number at 1 in 100. Regardless of which number is more accurate, the idea that there are potentially hundreds of thousands of Citadel agents working everyday in America is a disturbing one and suggests a massive failure of the American law enforcement community to protect this nation for its domestic enemies.

Jackson Cross, The Capitol City Chronicle, December 4th, 1983.
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
AslanC
Zenith Comics
Zenith Comics


Joined: Apr 04, 2010
Posts: 1130
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
AslanC
Zenith Comics
Zenith Comics


Joined: Apr 04, 2010
Posts: 1130
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just to see, is anyone reading this stuff?

Should I continue?
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Lindharin
Paragon
Paragon


Joined: Apr 05, 2010
Posts: 612
Location: New York

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I got through about a third of it yesterday, but I ran out of time. I have kept it open in its own tab, specifically to go back to later tonight or tomorrow morning. I'll post my thoughts as soon as I catch up.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AslanC
Zenith Comics
Zenith Comics


Joined: Apr 04, 2010
Posts: 1130
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cool beans!

One reader is all I need Smile
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
MrJupiter
Cosmic Hero
Cosmic Hero


Joined: Apr 06, 2010
Posts: 1484
Location: Trenton, Ont. (Canada)

PostPosted: Sat Apr 17, 2010 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You have quite the rich setting material there, AslanC. I definately get the Watchmen-like vibe while reading this. (I've never read the original comic but I hope that watching the movie thrice and viewing a promo video - featuring background and feature interviews with the lesser charcters - counts!).

As a side note, I really like how you presented the document in your 7th post. How did you erase the background beyond the page so that it appears on the post as actually being a sheet tilted to one side?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Lindharin
Paragon
Paragon


Joined: Apr 05, 2010
Posts: 612
Location: New York

PostPosted: Sun Apr 18, 2010 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Finally got a chance to finish it (one of the few good things about insomnia Wink ). Very cool information, AslanC! I'm looking forward to more.

MrJupiter, the image is a .png file, which supports transparency. I assume that he made the image with a transparent background, and when it gets displayed here the area beyond the paper edges just show the forum background through the transparent background.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AslanC
Zenith Comics
Zenith Comics


Joined: Apr 04, 2010
Posts: 1130
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2010 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the words lads Smile

More to come, much more actually, just been a crazy few days where I haven't had much of a chance to do any writing.

Stay tuned!
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
AslanC
Zenith Comics
Zenith Comics


Joined: Apr 04, 2010
Posts: 1130
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2010 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As for how the typewriter page was done Mr. J, Lindharin has it right, made it a transparent background png in Photoshop and rotated it a bit.
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Coyote
Evil Genius
Evil Genius


Joined: Apr 04, 2010
Posts: 114
Location: Earth-Prime

PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2010 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Me likey.
_________________
I eat my coffee straight from the can, why dilute it?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    BASH - Basic Action Super Heroes Forum Index -> Your Campaign Settings All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3
  
  

Jump to:   

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You cannot download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001 phpBB Group

Page Generation: 0.19 Seconds
:: BASH! style by Basic Action Games ::